| Egyptian Journal of Archeological and Restoration Studies


EJARS (Established 2011)

Attention (Memorial Issue)!

EJARS will publish a special memorial issue for the late Prof. Mohamed Abdelhady, Professor of restoration for his praiseworthy efforts at developing the school of restoration in the Arab World, with Issue managers (Shaaban Abd El-Aal -- Smm00@fayoum.edu.eg), (Mohamed Abdel Wadood Abdel Azim -- Maa02@fayoum.edu.eg), (Walid Ali Mohammed Mahmoud -- walid.ali@fayoum.edu.eg) and (Hamada Sadek -- Hsr00@fayoum.edu.eg).

Volume 6 ,issue 1 | Winter and Spring 2016 | Pages : 39-48

MONITORING AIR POLLUTANTS AND DUST IN LUXOR MUSEUM OF THE ANCIENT ART

Document Type: Original Article

DOI: 10.21608/ejars.2016.6844

pages: 39-48

Authors:
El-Gohary, M 1 ; Marouf, M. 1 ; Metwally, M. 2

1 Conservation dept., Faculty of Arts, Sohag Univ.
2 nstitute of Conservation, Ministry of higher Education, Luxor

Abstract:
Air pollutants and dust affected the artifacts in Luxor museum; one of the most important museums in Egypt and the Middle East. Therefore, the present investigation is concerned with air pollutants and dust that may be affective or catalyst in the deterioration of Luxor museum's artifacts using the following technique: a) The checker of PH used for monitoring and identifying alkaline and acidic areas inside the museum. b) The passive indicator device used for Ammonia and acetic acid monitored inside the museum; it is caused by the upper un cover concrete part of the walls. c) XRF analyses of dust samples that were collected using the sticky straps followed by digital microscope investigation. Results confirm the existence of Ammonia and acetic acid in the museum, In addition, the physical and chemical mechanism led to the current deterioration states of both wooden basses and the limestone wall of Ikhnaton's.

Keywords:
Monitoring; Checker; Passive indicator; Degradation; Ventilation; Discoloration; Salt efflorescence

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