| Egyptian Journal of Archeological and Restoration Studies


EJARS (Established 2011)

Volume 13 ,issue 2 | Summer and Autumn 2023 | Pages : 295-299

THE BEE "bit" IN EGYPTIAN AND GREEK RELIGION

Document Type: Original Article

DOI: 10.21608/ejars.2023.330912

pages: 295-299

Authors:
Abd El-Maceh, S. 1 (*), El-Sayed, M. 2 & Kupelian, M. 2

1 PhD Student, Tourism Guidance dept., Faculty of Tourism and Hospitality, Helwan Univ., Cairo, Egypt,
2 Tourism Giddiness dept., Faculty of Tourism and Hotel management, Helwan Univ., Cairo, Egypt

Abstract:
The history of the bee in ancient cultures was a common area for studying primitive cultures and was referred to in the idea that myths originated from ritualistic acts. The bee hieroglyph which was noted on inscriptions from the time of the first dynasty until the end of the Graeco-Roman period was a well-known symbol for royalty for nearly four thousand years. The prevalence of this particular bee hieroglyph on tombs, statues, wall paintings other types of bee hie-roglyphs in Egyptian writing, indicates the sundry functions of bee-keeping and honey whether secular or religious.

Keywords:
Honey bee Egyptian Greek Myth Religion

Statistics :
Article views: 196
PDF Downloads: 44